Louisa May Alcott

Louisa May Alcott never intended to write "Little Women." She had dismissed her publisher's pleas for such a novel. Written out of necessity to support her family, the book had an astounding success that changed her life, a life which turned out very differently from that of her beloved heroine Jo March. In "Louisa May Alcott, "Susan Cheever, the acclaimed author of "American Bloomsbury, "returns to Concord, Massachusetts, to explore the life of...

Continue reading

As Good as I Could Be

Having children transforms us -- through the amazing power of our love for them and theirs for us, through the anger they can provoke, and because being good parents means we must accept that we are no longer children. In As Good as I Could Be, bestselling author Susan Cheever chronicles with passion and courage her own imperfect transformation, offering inspiration for other parents doing the best they can. By relating the trials...

Continue reading

Looking for Work

Though a very easy read, this book seemed indulgent filled with anecdotes and trivialities of braggadocio.

Continue reading

Drinking in America

The Pilgrims landed the Mayflower at Plymouth because they were running out of beer, and since that cold day in November of 1620 alcohol has played a pivotal part in American history. For most of its history, America has been the most bibulous country in the world, and the secret truth then and now is that a bottle of rum, a keg of hard cider or even a dry martini was often the silent third party to many decisions that have shaped our history....

Continue reading

Desire

We've all felt the giddy flutter of excitement when our new lover walks into the room. Waited by the phone, changed our plans...But are we in love, or is there something darker at work? In "Desire: Where Sex Meets Addiction," Susan Cheever explores the shifting boundaries between the feelings of passion and addiction, desire and need, and she raises provocative and important questions about who we love and why.Elegantly written and thoughtfully...

Continue reading

Treetops

Fromompelling companion to her heralded memoir Home Before Dark. Readers will meet Thomas Watson, Susan's great grandfather, who invented the telephone with Alexander Graham Bell; Milton Winternitz, Susan's grandfather, who almost singlehandedly built Yale Medical School; and John Cheever, Susan's father, the great American writer. The effects of these great men on the women of Susan's family will offer readers fascination and insight....

Continue reading