The Iliad

"The finest translation of Homer ever made into the English language."—William Arrowsmith"Certainly the best modern verse translation."—Gilbert Highet "This magnificent translation of Homer's epic poem . . . will appeal to admirers of Homer and the classics, and the multitude who always wanted to read the great Iliad but never got around to doing so."—The American Book Collector"Perhaps closer to Homer in every way than...

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The Essential Odyssey

This generous abridgment of Stanley Lombardo's translation of the Odyssey offers more than half of the epic, including all of its best-known episodes and finest poetry, while providing concise summaries for omitted books and passages. Sheila Murnaghan's Introduction, a shortened version of her essay for the unabridged edition, is ideal for readers new to this remarkable tale of the homecoming of Odysseus.

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Iliade. Episodi scelti e tradotti da Salvatore Quasimodo

What I learned from this book (in no particular order):1. Victory or defeat in ancient Greek wars is primarily the result of marital spats and/or petty sibling rivalry in Zeus and Hera’s dysfunctional divine household.2. Zeus “the father of gods and men” is a henpecked husband who is also partial to domestic abuse.3. If you take a pretty girl who is the daughter of a priest of Apollo as war booty and...

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The Odyssey

The most eloquent English-language translation of Homer's epic chronicle of the Greek hero Odysseus and his arduous journey home after the Trojan War. Richmond Alexander Lattimore (May 61906–February 261984) was an American poet and translator known for his translations of the Greek classics, including his versions of The Iliad and The Odyssey, which are generally considered as among the best English translations available. Reviews - "The finest...

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The Odyssey

So my first “non-school related" experience with Homer’s classic tale, and my most powerful impression, beyond the overall splendor of the story, was...HOLY SHIT SNACKS these Greeks were a violent bunch. Case in point: ...they hauled him out through the doorway into the court, lopped his nose and ears with a ruthless knife, tore his genitals out for the dogs to eat rawand in manic fury hacked off...

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Odissea

In the Western classical tradition, Homer (Greek: Όμηρος) is considered the author of The Iliad and The Odyssey, and is revered as the greatest of ancient Greek epic poets. These epics lie at the beginning of the Western canon of literature, and have had an enormous influence on the history of literature.When he lived is unknown. Herodotus estimates that Homer lived 400 years before his own...

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The Odyssey

The most popular epic of Western culture springs to life in Allen Mandelbaum's magnificent translation.Homer's masterpiece tells the story of Odysseus, the ideal Greek hero, as he travels home to Ithaca after the Trojan War—a journey of ten years and countless thrilling adventures. Rich in Greek folklore and myth, featuring gods and goddesses, monsters and sorceresses, The Odyssey has enchanted listeners around the world for...

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Ilias. Volumen prius rhapsodias I-XII continens

A Ilíada, epopéia homérica em 24 cantos, narra as aventuras do herói grego Aquiles durante a última fase da Guerra de Tróia, na região da Tessália. Em seus quase 16 mil versos, a obra fala de guerra e heroísmo, mas também deixa muito clara e aparente a debilidade do ser humano diante das incertezas que o destino lhe reserva; a vontade dos deuses e a sorte do homem, fortuna e fatalidade caminham...

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Odyssey

So my first “non-school related" experience with Homer’s classic tale, and my most powerful impression, beyond the overall splendor of the story, was...HOLY SHIT SNACKS these Greeks were a violent bunch. Case in point: ...they hauled him out through the doorway into the court, lopped his nose and ears with a ruthless knife, tore his genitals out for the dogs to eat rawand in manic fury hacked off...

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Marvel Classics Comics 26 - The Iliad

Although the story covers only a few weeks in the final year of the war, the Iliad mentions or alludes to many of the Greek legends about the siege; the earlier events, such as the gathering of warriors for the siege, the cause of the war, and related concerns tend to appear near the beginning. Then the epic narrative takes up events prophesied for the future, such as Achilles' looming death and the sack of Troy, prefigured and alluded to more...

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The Rage of Achilles

In the Western classical tradition, Homer (Greek: Όμηρος) is considered the author of The Iliad and The Odyssey, and is revered as the greatest of ancient Greek epic poets. These epics lie at the beginning of the Western canon of literature, and have had an enormous influence on the history of literature.When he lived is unknown. Herodotus estimates that Homer lived 400 years before his own...

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Circe and the Cyclops (Little Black Classics #70)

'You must be Odysseus, man of twists and turns...' The tales of Odysseus's struggle with a man-eating Cyclops and Circe, the beautiful enchantress who turns men into swine. Introducing Little Black Classics: 80 books for Penguin's 80th birthday. Little Black Classics celebrate the huge range and diversity of Penguin Classics, with books from around the world and across many centuries. They take us from a balloon ride over...

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The Iliad and the Odyssey

Hector bidding farewell to his wife and baby son, Odysseus bound to the mast listening to the Sirens, Penelope at the loom, Achilles dragging Hector's body round the walls of Troy - scenes from Homer have been reportrayed in every generation. The questions about mortality and identity that Homer's heroes ask, the bonds of love, respect and fellowship that motivate them, have gripped audiences for three millennia.Chapman's Iliad and...

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Reading The Iliad in 2 Weeks

About This BookThis is an adapted version of The Iliad by Homer. This version is specially adapted and edited for ESL learners and young readers around world.The original version of The Iliad is an epic poem about the Trojan War. It mainly tells of the battles and events during the weeks of a quarrel between King Agamemnon and the famous hero, Achilles. Along with The Odyssey also by Homer, The Iliad is one of the oldest works of...

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Die Ilias

In diesem Epos wird die archaische Welt der Kriegerkaste, die den Kampf um Troja ausfocht, präsent: Kampf und Abenteuer, Sieg und Untergang, Liebe und Hass, Heroentum und Niedrigkeit, Mythos und historische Wirklichkeit. Wolfgang Schadewaldts Vers-für-Vers-Übertragung der »Ilias« folgt - ohne die antike Metrik zu imitieren - streng der Darstellungskunst attischer Adelsepik. Übersetzt von Wolfgang Schadewaldt, mit einer...

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The Odyssey

Literature's grandest evocation of life's journey, at once an ageless human story and an individual test of moral endurance, Homer's ancient Greek epic The Odyssey is translated by Robert Fagles with an introduction and notes by Bernard Knox in Penguin Classics. When Robert Fagles' translation of The Iliad was published in 1990, critics and scholars alike hailed it as a masterpiece. Here, one of the great modern translators presents us with The...

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Iliad and Odyssey

The best story ever-it has everything-love, romance, war, brave, handsome men, exotic places, monsters, beautiful women-its all in these two stories. Odysseus is my all-time favorite hero, and although he is a brave hero, he has his faults and it's this combination that makes him so lovable and what makes this story one of the greatest of all time. The text can be difficult to read, and following the who's who of the gods and goddesses can be...

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Iliad, Book VI

The sixth book of the Iliad includes some of the most memorable and best-loved episodes in the whole poem: it holds meaning and interest for many different people, not just students of ancient Greek. Book 6 describes how Glaukos and Diomedes, though fighting on opposite sides, recognise an ancient bond of hospitality and exchange gifts on the battlefield. It then follows Hector as he enters the city of Troy and meets the most important people in...

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