NEW WRITING AND DAYLIGHT 1946 JOHN LEHMANN LONDON First Published September 1946 This book is produced in complete conformity with the authorized economy standards MADE AND PRINTED IN GREAT BRITAIN BY PURNRLL AND SONS, LTD., PAULTON SOMERSET AND LONDON CONTENTS IN DAYLIGHT n John Lehmann 7 AUTOLYCUS Louis MacNeice 13 THE FIVE FACES OF PITY George Barker 14 IPHIGENIA IN TAURIS John Heath-Stubbs 17 THE LITTLE FEARS William Sansom 1 8 THE EXCURSION Gavin Lambert 31 THE J EATH FEAST OF THE GREEKS Angelos Sikelianos 44 TWO POEMS George Seferis 47 THE MAD POMEGRANATE-TREE OdySSCUS Elytis 48 MADAME PARPILLONS INN Noel Devaulx 49 TWO POEMS FrantiSek Halas 56 THE TIME OF CALAMITY Andre Chamson 57 THE FUTURE OF FICTION i. by Rose Macaulay 71 n. by V. S. Pritchett 75 m. by Arthur Koestler 82 iv. by L. P. Hartley 86 v. by Walter Allen 91 vi. by Osbert Sitwell 95 THE EUROPEAN ARTIST PAUL VALERY Andre Gide 98 A MASTER OF PASTICHE Michael Ayrton 108 AT THE KLEE EXHIBITION Keith Vaughan 117 FIVE ATHENIAN ARTISTS Alexis SoloHlOS 122 BETWEEN EAST AND WEST Vdclav Cerny 129 THE WORLD OF ALFRED HITCHCOCK J. Maclaren-RoSS 134 IAGO Edith Sitwell 141 TWO POEMS Lawrence Durrell 151 POEM Terence Tiller 153 PROM A CYPRUS DIARY Laurie Lee 153 ILLUSTRATIONS GRUNEWALD DETAIL FROM CRUCIFIXION facing page 112 PICASSO STUDY OF A HAND 112 PAUL KLEE THE MOUNTAIN OF THE SACRED CAT 112 PAUL KLEE COMEDY 113 PAUL KLEE FLORA IN AN OLD ROSE GARDEN 113 NIKOS ENGONOPOULOS HOUSE IN PIRAEUS WITH STATUE 113 Romeo and Juliet IN PRAGUE 128 Caligula IN PARIS, ,, 128 LES BALLETS DES CHAMPS ELYSEES Les Forains 128 LES BALLETS DES CHAMPS ELYSEES Let AlUOUTS de Jupiter 1 28 Adam ero AT COVENT GARDEN 129 The Sleeping Beauty AT COVENTGARDEN 129 Tobacco Road IN ATHENS 129 Mourning Becomes Electra IN ATHENS 129 Madanu Parpillons Inn will be included in a collection of stories by Noel Devaulx to be published by Allan Wingate. la Daylight H By JOHN LEHMANN FROM my bedroom window I can see, except where the summer green of the trees has closed up all the interstices of the great branching plane trees, the golden cross that tops the Brompton Oratory. I live, in fact, not more than a rather long and powerful stones throw from that imposing mausoleum of bygone culture, the Victoria and Albert Museum. One morning, early this year, I was roused from sleep by a noise of raging tigers. Leaping out of bed and pulling the curtains apart, I beheld in the grey dawn light an extraordinary scene down in the street, in the middle distance, a mob of black coated human beings most of them evidently early workers, for they were still jumping off buses that stood jammed in the m6l e were besieging the doors of the Museum, and fighting savagely with one another, while cries of Picasso We want Picasso were mixed with even more blood-curdling utterances. ... It was a relief, a few seconds later, to wake up in truth and find the curtains still drawn, the streets silent, and the whole thing nothing but a dream. The sources of this dream were dubiously mixed, but I traced one back, before I fell asleep again, to a gathering in Paris, a few weeks before, when several French writers had expressed to me, in politely veiled fashion, their distress and perplexity about the disturbances which had marked, and were still marking, the Picasso-Matisse Exhibition at the Victoria and Albert. It took some time to reassure them that these disturbances werepurely imaginary, that French prestige had suffered no fatal blow, and that such scenes as some journalist with an axe to grind had described for them could never take place in modern London. Regretfully, I realized that I had convinced very few of them. But what was far worse was that, on reflection, I discovered that I hadnt convinced myself. My uneasiness grew on the homeward journey and was sharply inflamed a day or two later by an alarming incident...