In 1910, six young American philosophers came together to rebel against the hegemony of idealist philosophy. Later that year "The Program and First Platform of Six Realists" appeared in the "Journal of Philosophy. In this article, the six vigorously attacked idealism and outlined a new philosophy. A lively debate ensued that not only brought realism back on the map but that also invigorated idealism itself. "American New Realism 1910-1920 for the first time brings together the key papers of this debate. A total of 82 papers are included. They range from early responses to what came to be called "the new realism," to detailed criticisms of the new realists' more mature views as they were expressed in their second cooperative effort "The New Realism, which appeared in 1912. American new realism mirrors in important respects the resurgence of realism in Great Britain. At the same time, however, there are significant differences, due in part to the strong presence of pragmatism in American philosophy. This collection will appeal to scholars and graduate students who are interested in the history of twentieth-century philosophy or who are interested in the historical background of contemporary discussions in metaphysics and epistemology.