This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1902 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER VII. THE MINISTER. "He prayeth best that loveth best.' WHEN her late Majesty ascended the Throne, the Rev. Alexander Wilson was minister of the Parish of Aberlour, having held the living for a number of years, and was at the time an old man. The Presbytery had pressed him for some time to get an assistant. His reply was—"The hirelin's nae like the auld shepherd." On the first Sunday after the Queen's coronation he prayed for the defunct King (George IV.). On being told that he prayed for the dead monarch, he remarked—" Weel, weel, he'll nae be better nor waur for onything I said aboot him." On the next Sunday he remembered the Queen, but forgot her name. After a long pause, he prayed—-" May the Lord bless and protect her young Majesty, the Queen—the Queen—extraordinary!" After that incident the minister of Aberlour never ascended the pulpit stairs again. The Presbytery met, and wisely recommended him to accept the services of the Rev. Cosmo Macpherson, who ministered to the people of Aberlour until Mr. Wilson's death. Mr. Wilson was in many respects a typical parish minister of the old school that were fast dying out when our late beloved Queen began to reign. They were generally men of much learning, and many of them sons of humble parents, and they easily adapted themselves to their surroundings and the homely speech of their people. Some of them, like the minister of Aberlour, had a strain of dry humour and sarcasm that came out during intercourse with their parishioners. Some little time before Mr. Wilson's prayer for the Queen, in the absence of Mr. Asher, the minister of Inveraven, he was elected to fill his pulpit, and on a Sabbath morning, with the help of Annie Dye (his housekeeper), the minister mounted his gig at...