This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1856 edition. Excerpt: ... CHAPTER XVI. EXILE AND DEATH. Where now is the Agrippa who began the world averse from strife, and who, when at the outset of his career as a scholar he was attacked by the monk Catilinet, addressed his enemy with the soft voice of Christian expostulation ? Alas for him, he is the same man still. His violence in later years was but the struggling of a spirit, pure and sensitive, against a torment urged beyond its powers of endurance; it is true in one sense that he fought but as the deer fights when at bay. Young motherless children were about him, who looked up to him for sustenance. Because he was unable to abase his soul below the level to which God enabled him to raise it, he met danger upon all the paths he tried, and during his whole life the men who brought him into peril were especially the meaner classes of the monks. There was a feminine element perceptible in his whole character, — the natural gentleness, the affectionate playfulness, the quick, nervous perception, the unworldly aspiration, and the want of tact in dealing with the world; the impulse to seek happiness in a domestic life belonged to this part of Agrippa's nature, and to the same part of it belonged THE FAITHLESS WIFE. 313 his scolding of the monks and courtiers. There may have been much of the man's vigour put into his way of speech, but I think that Cornelius resented wrong and cruelty much as a true woman might resent it, and that the hard fighting to which he betook himself at last was not that of a man by nature violent, but—paradox as it may seem to say so—the inevitable issue to which he was led by all that was most truly amiable in his nature. In the last letter of his on record he is found inviting the most learned Dryander to a supper, in the name of...